Author Topic: Getting past the hagiography surrounding Fred Rogers  (Read 17286 times)

MIKEBENNIDICT

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Re: Getting past the hagiography surrounding Fred Rogers
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2013, 02:55:42 PM »
Welcome to the forums elmtree!  It isn't quite as active as it used to be but nevertheless there is a lot to read about. 

In real life he did have constant battles with his son (maybe son(s) plural) in the mid 70s.  I can't remember which one but one of them was a rebellious teenager.  Not something that you would expect Fred to have to deal with;

I don't understand why you would think Fred's son would of been any different than any others just because he was famous.

mitsguy2001

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Re: Getting past the hagiography surrounding Fred Rogers
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2013, 10:17:57 PM »
Welcome to the forums elmtree!  It isn't quite as active as it used to be but nevertheless there is a lot to read about. 

In real life he did have constant battles with his son (maybe son(s) plural) in the mid 70s.  I can't remember which one but one of them was a rebellious teenager.  Not something that you would expect Fred to have to deal with;

I don't understand why you would think Fred's son would of been any different than any others just because he was famous.

I think some people may have expected Fred's son to be similar to Fred, and not the rebelious type.  What we don't know if he Fred's son was just the typical teenager, or if his rebellion went beyond that.

MIKEBENNIDICT

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Re: Getting past the hagiography surrounding Fred Rogers
« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2015, 01:24:42 PM »
Welcome to the forums elmtree!  It isn't quite as active as it used to be but nevertheless there is a lot to read about. 

In real life he did have constant battles with his son (maybe son(s) plural) in the mid 70s.  I can't remember which one but one of them was a rebellious teenager.  Not something that you would expect Fred to have to deal with; however, for who he was and stood for I guess there would be a higher percentage for his own children to have problems.  Much like how a pastor's children tend get into trouble.  I could probably imagine his children probably got teased to death.  I imagine Fred probably carried a burden that if he couldn't take care of his own children how is he suppose to be the man that he was.  From a historical perspective, I think history will override his family issues and will still carry the stance that he cared for children through the tv medium.  In my opinion, during the 1979-2001 era of MRN, I think you can tell that he shows more confidence in what he is doing. 

Mike
I was thinking about this and while it's obvious that the Rogers family was like anyone elses but I wonder what it was like for both sons to have grown up with their dad being who he was?


I remember seeing an online with Bob McGrath who of course in Bob on Sesame Street and discuss when that the show began some of his older children felt funny about their father starring in this bran new show.

Both of Fred's sons probably had some of the same difficulty especially in their teen years in which seems to as even Fed himself said in an interview is probably rough for everyone and he himself had a lot of difficulty.

And even if it was both John and James' decision to make appearances on their dad's show I wonder if they later felt odd about it later on?


But another thing I wonder is about how he and Joanne brought them up?


Because he had been so critical all of his adult life about TV which is how he got into it in the first place and probably had various feelings about the movie and music industry.


I  wonder kind of rules they both had on what the kids could see and listen to?

Besides feeling insecure about their famous father.

mitsguy2001

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Re: Getting past the hagiography surrounding Fred Rogers
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2015, 10:52:45 AM »
There really has not been much said at all about Fred's sons.  They seem to be living private lives outside of the spotlight, which is fine.  There was that one article from the 70s that mentioned them being rebellious, but we have no idea whether that was typical teenage rebellion, or something more.  Betty once posted here that Fred's sons suffered because of Fred.  But she no longer posts here so I doubt that we will get an ellaboration on what she meant.  I don't know if Fred's sons ever directly told anything to Betty (in which case they may have told her in confidence) or if Betty was just speculating.  Another thing that is interesting is that Betty pointed out that Fred often talked about his grandfather Fred McFeely, but never about his parents.  I don't know what kind of relationship Fred had with his parents.  The song "Wishes Don't Make Things Come True" implies that he may have had a rough relationship with his parents.