Author Topic: Special Programs Beyond The Neighborhood  (Read 7690 times)

earnhardtfan4life

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Re: Special Programs Beyond The Neighborhood
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2011, 01:31:15 PM »
This article dates to 2007.  I thought this was interesting.  Which probably means that it's already been done.

Mr. Rogers' shows to be digitized
Project includes 900 episodes, mail and print material; $370,000 in grants, gifts fund it
Thursday, July 12, 2007
By Judy Laurinatis, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
A project to digitize 900 "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" episodes dating to 1967, as well as thousands of pages of print material, 35 years worth of viewer mail and audio recordings of Fred Rogers' music is now under way at Saint Vincent College.

Brother David Kelly, archivist for the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media, said the center is in the first stages of the project and phase one, consisting of the digitization of 200 television episodes, should be completed by September.



 
 Post-Gazette
Saint Vincent Librarian Brother David works on a major project that includes the papers, mail and 900 "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" shows to be archived in digital format.
Click photo for larger image.
The "Mister Rogers Neighborhood" shows will be first in the project. Later, video from other special programs will also be digitized along with the papers, photographs and musical recordings.
Funding for the project totals nearly $370,000 in grants and gifts.

"This is a unique project for us," Brother David said. The college has never before attempted an archival project of this scale. It is a collaboration between the on-campus Fred Rogers Center and Family Communications, Inc., the production company founded by the late Mr. Rogers.

Brother David said digitization is one way to preserve archival material because it eliminates the need to handle the originals. The actual work to transfer the original analog program copies, which are in a variety of formats, to streaming video on a dedicated server is being done by a firm specializing in the process. There are no plans to transfer the programs to CD or DVD format right now.

Although the bulk of the digitized material will be available through electronic access only, and primarily for research purposes, Family Communications Inc. will receive additional copies to be used for its own purposes.

The physical materials making up the Fred Rogers Archive will be housed in the Rogers Center building currently under construction. Completion of the building is expected in September 2008.

A wide range of Fred Rogers' projects and interests will be documented in the archive. Scholars will be able to trace an idea from Fred Rogers' initial concept to a particular television program or a set of programs.

The materials will be available to researchers, educators and media specialists interested in studying the fields of child development, early learning and children's media.

The "Mister Rogers Neighborhood" shows will be first in the project. Later, video from other special programs will also be digitized, as well as the papers, photographs and musical recordings.



 
 Lake Fong, Post-Gazette
Fred Rogers plays piano while being interviewed in 2001 at the WQED studio.
Click photo for larger image.
Earlier programs that will be digitized in the future include "The Children's Corner," Mr. Rogers' original, mid-1950s programs he produced for the fledgling WQED-TV, the public television station he helped found. He also went to Canada and developed programming for the Canadian Broadcasting Co., which is also scheduled to be digitized. He began producing "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" when he returned to Pittsburgh from Canada.
During his career, Mr. Rogers won two Peabody Awards, four Emmys and a Presidential Medal of Freedom. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 1999.

Mr. Rogers died in 2003 at the age of 74.

"We are completing this project the way we think Fred would want it," Brother David said.

First published on July 12, 2007 at 6:17 am
Judy Laurinatis can be reached at jlaurinatis@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1228.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07193/800910-56.stm#ixzz1VV6vdHRu

Paul

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Re: Special Programs Beyond The Neighborhood
« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2011, 07:51:54 PM »
It's seems like I heard that that was completed somewhere... At least everything is being preserved, even if we don't have access to it.